Fears over toxic waste buried in yards like "hidden treasure"

PANCEVO, Serbia -- Dozens of rusty barrels and plastic tubs filled with a dark, oily liquid cluttered a muddy yard where chickens roamed. More brimming containers packed a wooden barn. The property in northern Serbia, located next to farmland and a railway line, stored about 100 tons of likely hazardous waste altogether, the country's environmental protection ministry said. Authorities found it last month, along with another big batch cemented into the walls of a nearby brick factory.

A string of similar discoveries has triggered alarms in Serbia, where masses of poorly secured industrial waste are believed to have been dumped or hidden and could pose long-term environmental and public health dangers.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/serbia-toxic-waste-health-risk-decades-corruption-eu-bid-looming/

Scientists Have Found Trace Levels of Emerging Contaminants in the Triangle’s Water. Does the DEQ Have the Resources to Keep Up?

The Duke researchers who discovered trace amounts of contaminants in water sources around the Triangle last year think they may be closer to understanding where they're coming from. The potentially toxic contaminants, known as perfluorinated chemicals, or PFCs, are known to be especially elusive and difficult to track.

But at a forum last month sponsored by the Sierra Club and N.C. Central, Lee Ferguson, an environmental analytical chemist at Duke University, said that his team might have some ideas. In some cases, the chemicals could be coming from sewage that is recycled and used for agriculture. The repurposed sewage can flow into tributaries of larger bodies of water. And since wastewater treatment plants aren't accustomed to looking for these little-known compounds, they're not especially good at removing them from drinking water. In other cases, the chemicals could be carried through rainwater or the air.

https://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/scientists-have-found-trace-levels-of-emerging-contaminants-in-the-triangles-water-does-the-deq-have-the-resources-to-keep-up/Content?oid=13039402

550 gallons of coolant leak into Straits of Mackinac

LANSING – A leak this week of hundreds of gallons of coolant from submerged cables in the Straits of Mackinac was heightening concerns Wednesday about aging pipelines carrying large volumes of oil through the environmentally sensitive area.

“It’s just another indication of the danger of having aging infrastructure in the Straits and what risk that poses to the Great Lakes,” said James Clift, policy director for the Lansing-based Michigan Environmental Council.

Submerged cables that carried electricity between Michigan’s two peninsulas were shut down after leaking about 550 gallons of coolant fluid into the waterway that connects Lake Huron and Lake Michigan, officials said Tuesday.

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/04/04/straits-mackinac-line-5-cables/484825002/

Napa River headed for another tipping point

In June, Napa County voters will be asked to consider Measure C -- the Watershed and Oak Woodland Protection Initiative. This measure will protect some of the last intact uplands from development for viewshed considerations, increased recreational access, and protection of biodiversity and clean drinking water sources.

I am a consulting fisheries and watershed scientist, and I offer my perspective on the benefits, if Measure C passes, and a note of caution about potentially irreversible impacts to domestic water supplies, should Measure C fail.

http://napavalleyregister.com/opinion/letters/napa-river-headed-for-another-tipping-point/article_cfba8af2-bff2-5109-a7ea-faec912ff570.html

Long-hidden toxic waste endangers Serbia's health, EU status

PANCEVO, Serbia (AP) — Dozens of rusty barrels and plastic tubs filled with a dark, oily liquid cluttered a muddy yard where chickens roamed. More brimming containers packed a wooden barn.

The property in northern Serbia, located next to farmland and a railway line, stored about 100 tons of likely hazardous waste altogether, the country's environmental protection ministry said. Authorities found it last month, along with another big batch cemented into the walls of a nearby brick factory.

A string of similar discoveries has triggered alarms in Serbia, where masses of poorly secured industrial waste are believed to have been dumped or hidden and could pose long-term environmental and public health dangers.

http://www.njherald.com/article/20180404/AP/304049923#

City of Plano: Toxin levels rise in some North Texas water, remain within annual regulatory limits

In the most extensive report yet, the levels of toxic byproducts detected in Plano drinking water rose substantially in March during a North Texas water supplier’s scheduled chlorine maintenance process, but remained well within levels mandated by federal regulators.

The levels of trihalomethanes—a toxic byproduct of disinfectants used by the North Texas Municipal Water District and other water suppliers—spiked in a group of Plano water samples collected on March 21 and analyzed by Allen-based Pace Analytical Services.

On average, water collected from 12 test sites throughout the city was assessed to contain trihalomethanes at levels of nearly 79 parts per billion, more than three times levels tested in January. When averaged with three other samples taken at each site since July, all sites would have met the state and federal regulatory standards, which require cities to maintain annual trihalomethane levels below 80 parts per billion.

https://communityimpact.com/dallas-fort-worth/plano/city-county/2018/04/02/city-of-plano-toxin-levels-rise-in-some-north-texas-water-remain-within-annual-regulatory-limits/

Nixon Condemns Cuomo’s Handling of Hoosick Falls Water Crisis!

The crisis began when factories in the small Rensselaer County community of Hoosick Falls  contaminated the public water supply with Perfluorooctanoic Acid, known as PFOA. PFOA has been linked to at least 6 serious illnesses: thyroid disease, kidney cancer, testicular cancer, ulcerative colitis, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and diagnosed high cholesterol. Testing found high levels of PFOA in the drinking water and in the bodies of local residents.

Democratic Candidate for governor Cynthia Nixon visited Hoosick Falls yesterday and met with residents who provided firsthand accounts of what it is like to deal with the toxic contamination of their drinking water.

Nixon was joined by community members and environmental activists to discuss the state’s response to the crisis.

https://artvoice.com/2018/04/05/nixon-condemns-cuomos-handling-hoosick-falls-water-crisis/#.Wst4mYjwbIU

Napa River headed for another tipping point

In June, Napa County voters will be asked to consider Measure C -- the Watershed and Oak Woodland Protection Initiative. This measure will protect some of the last intact uplands from development for viewshed considerations, increased recreational access, and protection of biodiversity and clean drinking water sources.

I am a consulting fisheries and watershed scientist, and I offer my perspective on the benefits, if Measure C passes, and a note of caution about potentially irreversible impacts to domestic water supplies, should Measure C fail.

http://napavalleyregister.com/opinion/letters/napa-river-headed-for-another-tipping-point/article_cfba8af2-bff2-5109-a7ea-faec912ff570.html

Protest against release of toxic water in Sutlej

Members of Jeewan Bachao Samaj Bachao Society staged a protest outside the office of the Ludhiana Deputy Commissioner, Pradeep Aggrawal, on Thursday. The protest was staged against the release of dirty and toxic water of city-based industries and dairies into the Sutlej River through Buddha Nullah.

The agitating members of society demanded that the state government should stop release of dirty and toxic industrial water into the Sutlej River.

Members of society claimed that the Sutlej River water had become so dirty that it kept stinking whole time.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/ludhiana/protest-against-release-of-toxic-water-in-sutlej/569543.html

Toxic chemical bill advances

MONTPELIER — The Vermont House has approved a bill, prompted by the discovery of PFOA in Bennington's water, that provides for stricter regulation of toxic substances.

"The bottom line is that Vermonters deserve to know what toxic substances they are exposing themselves and their families to," said Speaker of the House Mitzi Johnson in a statement on Thursday. "This bill takes a modest but important step to better protect Vermonters, especially our children, from toxic chemicals."

The bill approved last week, S.103, is a version of a bill introduced last year following the discovery of PFOA contamination of drinking water in wells of Bennington residents.

http://www.benningtonbanner.com/stories/toxic-chemical-bill-advances,536156